Frequently Asked Questions

Family Dentistry

Caps, crowns, inlays, onlays… What’s the difference?

These are all ways to fix tooth that has been damaged by fracture or decay. Caps and crowns are the same thing. The correct term is crown, but many people refer to them as caps because they sit on a tooth like a cap sits on your head. Crowns, inlays, and onlays are all made in a laboratory. This means that they are made from impressions taken of the tooth. To place these restorations, two visits are needed. At the first visit, the tooth is prepared, the impression is taken, and a temporary restoration is made and placed. At the second visit, the temporary is removed and the permanent restoration is placed.

Which one of these restorations is used depends on how much of the tooth has been damaged and needs to be replaced. If the cavity is small, a filling works fine. For cavities that are a little larger, fillings are harder to place well and don’t hold up as well. For that reason, an inlay, this is made outside the mouth and cemented in place, will work better and last longer.

If part of the remaining tooth structure is weak, then the restoration can be made to wrap around that part. This supports the weak section and prevents it from breaking. If only part of the tooth needs to be protected, then it is called an onlay. If the entire tooth needs to be covered, it is a crown.

Crowns, inlays and onlays can be made from white material or gold. The white materials look beautiful. In fact, they are often invisible in the mouth; they look just like natural teeth. Gold does have one advantage: longevity.

In some cases, the choice is obvious. Sometimes, there are reasonable options depending on your priorities (cost, longevity, appearance). In every case, the situation will be discussed with you in advance so you can participate in the decision making process.

How does fluoride help prevent tooth decay?

Fluoride helps reverse and prevent tooth decay in three ways:

1. Promoting Tooth Remineralization 

Acids can demineralize a tooth — that is, create a weak spot that develops into a cavity. Fluoride helps promote the opposite process, called remineralization, which can reverse the very early stages of tooth decay.

2. Helping Teeth Become More Resistant to Tooth Decay 

Fluoride actually strengthens teeth, giving them natural protection against future tooth decay.

3. Inhibiting Oral Bacteria’s Ability to Create Tooth-Attacking Acids 

Fluoride disrupts bacteria’s ability to create sugars, the process that causes decay of tooth enamel.

Should I use an inter-dental brush? I see them in the store.

Floss is the ideal tool for cleaning in between healthy teeth and gums. Healthy gums hold close to the teeth and floss is thin enough to do the job without causing injury to the gums. Inter-dental brushes are effective for large dental gaps but can cause injury to otherwise healthy gums if forced into too-small spaces. Ask Dr. Cabot if an inter-dental brush is appropriate for your circumstances.

Why is it important to use dental floss?

Daily flossing is the best way to clean between the teeth and under the gum line. Flossing not only helps clean these spaces, it disrupts plaque colonies from building up and creating an infection in your gums.

Plaque is a sticky, almost invisible film that forms on the teeth. It is a growing colony of living bacteria, food debris, and saliva. The bacteria produce toxins (acids) that cause cavities and irritate and inflame the gums. Also, when plaque is not removed above and below the gum line, it hardens and turns into calculus (tartar). This can cause infection that can lead to destruction of the bone which holds your teeth.

When flossing, use an 18-inch strand of floss. Ease the floss between each tooth; then, sweep it up and down several times while curving around the tooth at the gum line. Don’t forget to floss behind your last tooth and to floss bridges and artificial teeth with the aid of a floss threader.

How can I prevent gum disease?

Good oral hygiene starts at home, though it needs to be supplemented by regular visits to our family and cosmetic dentistry practice, Queen Village Family Dentistry. Steps you can take to prevent tooth decay and gum disease include:

Thorough brushing

Brush at least twice daily using a soft-bristle toothbrush and an ADA-accepted fluoride toothpaste. This helps prevent tooth decay, gum disease, and the need for costly cosmetic or restorative dentistry in the future. Replace your brush every three to six months.

We at Queen Village Family Dentistry recommend using the Sonicare toothbrush which uses dynamic sonic technology to remove plaque, reduce gingivitis, improve gum health and reduce stains.

Proper flossing

Flossing is crucial to the health of your teeth and gums and the prevention of gum disease. Flossing is the best way to remove plaque and tartar between the teeth. It is also effective at preventing build-up that can lead to decay and bone loss/gum disease. When flossing, use an 18-inch strand of floss. Ease the floss between each tooth; then, sweep it up and down several times while curving around the tooth at the gum line. Don’t forget to floss behind your last tooth and to floss bridges and artificial teeth with the aid of a floss threader.

Regular check-ups

Regular dental visits, along with a thorough home care regimen, are critical to a lifetime of good oral health. General dentistry of this type can prevent the need for cosmetic or restorative dentistry later in life. Queen Village Family Dentistry looks forward to being your partner in managing your dental health needs.

What is periodontal or gum disease?

Periodontal disease is a result of bacterial infection and is largely preventable with proper oral hygiene. Early and moderate periodontal disease may exhibit few, if any, symptoms and is usually painless. Gingivitis is typically the first sign of advancing periodontal disease with inflamed or bleeding gums. Left untreated, periodontal disease progresses to bone loss which then causes permanent teeth to shift in their bite, loosen or fall out. Periodontal disease is the major cause of tooth loss in adults.

During each routine checkup, Dr. Cabot will examine you for periodontal disease. A periodontal probe is used to determine if there is any breakdown in the gum tissue attachment or if pockets have developed between your gums and teeth.

It is important to understand that patients with mild periodontal disease don’t feel discomfort. It is essential to have a professional evaluation to determine if you are prone to or already have periodontal disease. If one or both of your parents suffered tooth loss from periodontal disease you should make sure you will not have the same problems. With proper oral care, you can prevent the same outcome from happening to you.

How can I prevent tooth decay?

Tooth enamel is hard yet porous. Plaque on the surface of your teeth can produce acids that seep into the pores of the enamel. This process, called demineralization, can create a weak spot on the surface of the tooth that may become a cavity if left untreated.

To help strengthen weak spots and exposed roots and prevent the early stages of tooth decay, brush regularly with a fluoridated toothpaste and floss daily. Regular flossing and fluoride mouth rinses, as well as regular professional cleanings, will help prevent cavities and preserve your oral health.

How do I keep my child’s teeth healthy?

Following a few simple guidelines can help keep your child’s teeth strong and beautiful for life:

  • Start oral care early: Oral care should start soon after your child is born. After feeding, clean your child’s gums using gauze or a clean, damp cloth. As soon as your child’s teeth appear — as early as four months after birth — they should be brushed. Each day, brush your child’s teeth with a soft, wet toothbrush and a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.
  • Prevent nursing-bottle syndrome: Nursing-bottle mouth, also known as baby-bottle tooth decay or baby-bottle syndrome, can cause a baby’s front teeth to rapidly decay, which can lead to a lifetime of dental difficulties. Preventing nursing bottle mouth is easy: If you give your baby a bottle at nap or bed time, simply fill it with plain water rather than formula, milk, or juice—never let your child fall asleep with a bottle filled with a liquid other than water In addition, check your child for brown spots near the gums because they are a warning sign for tooth decay.
  • Take your child to the dentist: General, preventative dentistry should start early. A child’s first dental visit should take place at 2 to 3 years of age unless you see signs of problems or the child experiences trauma to the mouth or complains of pain in the mouth or jaw. Regular fluoride treatments, administered by a dentist, are especially helpful in strengthening enamel and arresting tooth decay for children. Contact Queen Village Family Dentistry today to schedule an appointment for your child.
  • Take advantage of dental sealants: Dental sealants are a popular and effective way to protect your child’s teeth against cavities.

Are payment plans available for my dental treatment?

Yes. We accept many types of dental insurance and will process your claim for you. We also accept most major credit cards, including Master Card or Visa.  Payment plans are available.

What if I have an emergency?

Please call Queen Village Family Dentistry’s main number (215-925-7330) as soon as you determine that you have a dental emergency. If this occurs during regular hours, Dr. Cabot will be glad to work you into our schedule. After hours, over the weekend and during holidays, please call the same number for the doctor’s emergency contact number.

Cosmetic Dentistry

Caps, crowns, inlays, onlays… What’s the difference?

These are all ways to fix tooth that has been damaged by fracture or decay. Caps and crowns are the same thing. The correct term is crown, but many people refer to them as caps because they sit on a tooth like a cap sits on your head. Crowns, inlays, and onlays are all made in a laboratory. This means that they are made from impressions taken of the tooth. To place these restorations, two visits are needed. At the first visit, the tooth is prepared, the impression is taken, and a temporary restoration is made and placed. At the second visit, the temporary is removed and the permanent restoration is placed.

Which one of these restorations is used depends on how much of the tooth has been damaged and needs to be replaced. If the cavity is small, a filling works fine. For cavities that are a little larger, fillings are harder to place well and don’t hold up as well. For that reason, an inlay, this is made outside the mouth and cemented in place, will work better and last longer.

If part of the remaining tooth structure is weak, then the restoration can be made to wrap around that part. This supports the weak section and prevents it from breaking. If only part of the tooth needs to be protected, then it is called an onlay. If the entire tooth needs to be covered, it is a crown.

Crowns, inlays and onlays can be made from white material or gold. The white materials look beautiful. In fact, they are often invisible in the mouth; they look just like natural teeth. Gold does have one advantage: longevity.

In some cases, the choice is obvious. Sometimes, there are reasonable options depending on your priorities (cost, longevity, appearance). In every case, the situation will be discussed with you in advance so you can participate in the decision making process.

How does fluoride help prevent tooth decay?

Fluoride helps reverse and prevent tooth decay in three ways:

1. Promoting Tooth Remineralization 

Acids can demineralize a tooth — that is, create a weak spot that develops into a cavity. Fluoride helps promote the opposite process, called remineralization, which can reverse the very early stages of tooth decay.

2. Helping Teeth Become More Resistant to Tooth Decay 

Fluoride actually strengthens teeth, giving them natural protection against future tooth decay.

3. Inhibiting Oral Bacteria’s Ability to Create Tooth-Attacking Acids 

Fluoride disrupts bacteria’s ability to create sugars, the process that causes decay of tooth enamel.

Should I use an inter-dental brush? I see them in the store.

Floss is the ideal tool for cleaning in between healthy teeth and gums. Healthy gums hold close to the teeth and floss is thin enough to do the job without causing injury to the gums. Inter-dental brushes are effective for large dental gaps but can cause injury to otherwise healthy gums if forced into too-small spaces. Ask Dr. Cabot if an inter-dental brush is appropriate for your circumstances.

Why is it important to use dental floss?

Daily flossing is the best way to clean between the teeth and under the gum line. Flossing not only helps clean these spaces, it disrupts plaque colonies from building up and creating an infection in your gums.

Plaque is a sticky, almost invisible film that forms on the teeth. It is a growing colony of living bacteria, food debris, and saliva. The bacteria produce toxins (acids) that cause cavities and irritate and inflame the gums. Also, when plaque is not removed above and below the gum line, it hardens and turns into calculus (tartar). This can cause infection that can lead to destruction of the bone which holds your teeth.

When flossing, use an 18-inch strand of floss. Ease the floss between each tooth; then, sweep it up and down several times while curving around the tooth at the gum line. Don’t forget to floss behind your last tooth and to floss bridges and artificial teeth with the aid of a floss threader.

How can I prevent gum disease?

Good oral hygiene starts at home, though it needs to be supplemented by regular visits to our family and cosmetic dentistry practice, Queen Village Family Dentistry. Steps you can take to prevent tooth decay and gum disease include:

Thorough brushing

Brush at least twice daily using a soft-bristle toothbrush and an ADA-accepted fluoride toothpaste. This helps prevent tooth decay, gum disease, and the need for costly cosmetic or restorative dentistry in the future. Replace your brush every three to six months.

We at Queen Village Family Dentistry recommend using the Sonicare toothbrush which uses dynamic sonic technology to remove plaque, reduce gingivitis, improve gum health and reduce stains.

Proper flossing

Flossing is crucial to the health of your teeth and gums and the prevention of gum disease. Flossing is the best way to remove plaque and tartar between the teeth. It is also effective at preventing build-up that can lead to decay and bone loss/gum disease. When flossing, use an 18-inch strand of floss. Ease the floss between each tooth; then, sweep it up and down several times while curving around the tooth at the gum line. Don’t forget to floss behind your last tooth and to floss bridges and artificial teeth with the aid of a floss threader.

Regular check-ups

Regular dental visits, along with a thorough home care regimen, are critical to a lifetime of good oral health. General dentistry of this type can prevent the need for cosmetic or restorative dentistry later in life. Queen Village Family Dentistry looks forward to being your partner in managing your dental health needs.

What is periodontal or gum disease?

Periodontal disease is a result of bacterial infection and is largely preventable with proper oral hygiene. Early and moderate periodontal disease may exhibit few, if any, symptoms and is usually painless. Gingivitis is typically the first sign of advancing periodontal disease with inflamed or bleeding gums. Left untreated, periodontal disease progresses to bone loss which then causes permanent teeth to shift in their bite, loosen or fall out. Periodontal disease is the major cause of tooth loss in adults.

During each routine checkup, Dr. Cabot will examine you for periodontal disease. A periodontal probe is used to determine if there is any breakdown in the gum tissue attachment or if pockets have developed between your gums and teeth.

It is important to understand that patients with mild periodontal disease don’t feel discomfort. It is essential to have a professional evaluation to determine if you are prone to or already have periodontal disease. If one or both of your parents suffered tooth loss from periodontal disease you should make sure you will not have the same problems. With proper oral care, you can prevent the same outcome from happening to you.

How can I prevent tooth decay?

Tooth enamel is hard yet porous. Plaque on the surface of your teeth can produce acids that seep into the pores of the enamel. This process, called demineralization, can create a weak spot on the surface of the tooth that may become a cavity if left untreated.

To help strengthen weak spots and exposed roots and prevent the early stages of tooth decay, brush regularly with a fluoridated toothpaste and floss daily. Regular flossing and fluoride mouth rinses, as well as regular professional cleanings, will help prevent cavities and preserve your oral health.

How do I keep my child’s teeth healthy?

Following a few simple guidelines can help keep your child’s teeth strong and beautiful for life:

  • Start oral care early: Oral care should start soon after your child is born. After feeding, clean your child’s gums using gauze or a clean, damp cloth. As soon as your child’s teeth appear — as early as four months after birth — they should be brushed. Each day, brush your child’s teeth with a soft, wet toothbrush and a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.
  • Prevent nursing-bottle syndrome: Nursing-bottle mouth, also known as baby-bottle tooth decay or baby-bottle syndrome, can cause a baby’s front teeth to rapidly decay, which can lead to a lifetime of dental difficulties. Preventing nursing bottle mouth is easy: If you give your baby a bottle at nap or bed time, simply fill it with plain water rather than formula, milk, or juice—never let your child fall asleep with a bottle filled with a liquid other than water In addition, check your child for brown spots near the gums because they are a warning sign for tooth decay.
  • Take your child to the dentist: General, preventative dentistry should start early. A child’s first dental visit should take place at 2 to 3 years of age unless you see signs of problems or the child experiences trauma to the mouth or complains of pain in the mouth or jaw. Regular fluoride treatments, administered by a dentist, are especially helpful in strengthening enamel and arresting tooth decay for children. Contact Queen Village Family Dentistry today to schedule an appointment for your child.
  • Take advantage of dental sealants: Dental sealants are a popular and effective way to protect your child’s teeth against cavities.

Are payment plans available for my dental treatment?

Yes. We accept many types of dental insurance and will process your claim for you. We also accept most major credit cards, including Master Card or Visa.  Payment plans are available.

What if I have an emergency?

Please call Queen Village Family Dentistry’s main number (215-925-7330) as soon as you determine that you have a dental emergency. If this occurs during regular hours, Dr. Cabot will be glad to work you into our schedule. After hours, over the weekend and during holidays, please call the same number for the doctor’s emergency contact number.